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it develops into a warm friendship and sometimes not so much. "boston globe" political reporter matt viser is here. he was at the white house reporting on that lunch. and also presidential historian douglas brinkley, my pal, whose most recent book, great book, "cronkite." let me start with matt. and the reporting here. we knew this was coming. the president said he wanted to do it, and there is a tradition of burying the hatchet. what else got done? did that get done? did they bury the hatchet? >> it was a symbolic moment that seems mostly symbolic. there doesn't appear to be much substance that came out of the meeting. you had romney driving up in the black suv -- he didn't drive, he was in the passenger side, but all alone -- nobody to open the door for him. >> how democratic. >> nobody opened the door for him. the inauguration stage is being built in the background. >> no secret service. >> no secret service for romney. and, in fact, i think he had to provide his name and -- >> no. who made him do that? >> date of birth, social security. had to provide just like anybody else. >> aren't
evening. i'm chris matthews on veterans day up here in boston. let me start tonight with this. it's a war of the worlds. one world is where you live. for you america is a land of many people and many places. there's the deep south of cotton fields and warm summers. there's the california coast of sunny beaches and highways. there are rural areas where agriculture is king, a magnate for those ready for hard work. there are big cities in this world of yours, chicago, new york, miami, all rich in ethnicity and spicy in their diversity. there are suburbs where people take a tolerant view, where the prevalent attitude is live and let live. in this america, your america, there are whites, blacks, latinos, people whose families came here from the asian pacific. there are progressives, moderates, and conservatives all engaged in a running argument about the kind of country they want to live in. the role they want this country playing around the globe. how we ought to be protecting oursds. okay. that's how you see it. i got another world for you. it's mainly traditional, culturally conservative, c
in boston. the conservatives never trusted him. they didn't even trust him when he got the republican nomination back in the spring of this year. the point is these individuals are opportunists, both on the republican side and also on the democratic side. they don't care about loyalty. they don't care about making sure that the best guy wins. what they care about is a paycheck. it's despicable, quite frankly. >> erin, let's take a look at this from both sides. looks like the hard right is saying, stop pushing us. it's not our fault. this guy wasn't a great candidate. moderates and pragmatic people are saying, oh, no, it's just -- you're too far right, too tough on women, too tough on minorities, too tough on latinos, young people. take a look at this guy, chris chocola, president of the conservative club for growth. he wrote today, quote, if you're a republican who yearns for the days of arlen specter and charlie crist you might welcome a return to gop insiders meddling in primaries but if you prefer republican party of toomey, rubio and cruz, you should be leery of the folks in washi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)